Labor Day weekend, what to expect whether driving or flying

AAA predicts this to be the busiest Labor Day travel weekend in three years, reaching pre-pandemic levels. Trends are similar to Memorial Day and Fourth of July weekends this year.

AAA predicts this to be the busiest Labor Day travel weekend in three years, reaching pre-pandemic levels. Trends are similar to the busy Memorial Day and Fourth of July weekends this year. And whether you are driving or flying, travel experts advise leaving early in the morning or late at night.

Bookings for domestic travel — including flights, cars, cruises, hotels and tours — are up 22 percent over Labor Day weekend in 2021, according to AAA spokesperson Ellen Edmonds. International bookings are up 104 percent as coronavirus restrictions continue to ease. Travel-booking app Hopper expects more than 12.7 million people to fly from U.S. airports between Thursday and Monday, including 1.8 million going abroad.

With high temperatures forecasted, too, you will not want to deal with any car troubles on the side of the road in the heat. Be sure to check your battery before a road trip.

AAA said their top calls received are for dead batteries and flat tires.

“The heat has a cumulative effect on car batteries, especially. And we’re at five heat waves at this point in the season,” Tidwell said. 

AAA anticipates more than 545,000 breakdowns nationwide for the Labor Day holiday based on last year’s data.

Being stranded on the road can be dangerous for drivers, their passengers, and those who come to help them. On average, a tow truck driver is killed every two weeks somewhere in the U.S. while helping a broken-down motorist, according to AAA.

Just like your luggage, all major airports will be packed

For those taking to the skies this weekend, catching the first flight of the day to avoid delays and using carry-ons to avoid lost luggage is highly reccomended. International flyers should make sure their passport hasn’t expired.

Leave a Reply

WIPLabsTallUSB
Mark Addy